SURVIVAL KEEPER OF THE FLAME
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BUILDING AN OPEN FIRE

THE CHALLENGE

A staple for camping, cooking and survival in the wilderness: Ignite and maintain your fire. If attempting as a survival exercise, only use the Survival Load Out. Adventure Load Out open for those looking for a fun activity. Your fire is the heart of your camp – acting as a primary source of heat in adverse conditions, a warm return to primal in social circumstance. Reconnect with your wild.

MISSION OBJECTIVE

Using minimal resources / what you would find out in the wilderness: Start and maintain a healthy fire suitable for keeping you warm and cooking on.

LOADOUT

SURVIVAL

I. Matches

II. Ferrocerium Rod

ADVENTURE

III. Home made Fire Lighters

IV. Additional Lighters

V. Your favourite crisps.

VI. … Marshmallows

CONSIDERATIONS

I. Remember the fire triangle: Heat, Fuel and Oxygen.

II. Consider the types of wood you have available – some burn better than others.

III. Along with that consider the size of wood available.

IV. Plan ahead – don’t leave yourself in a position where you fuel will run dry.

V. SURVIVAL – Do whatever it takes.

VI. ADVENTURE –  Make memories.

EXECUTION

I

FIND YOUR BASE

Find a place where you’ll be starting your fire. If this is in a home outdoor environment risks are relatively small. If you’re outside – ensure you are legally allowed to have an open fire prior to anything for recreational purposes. If you’re in the wilderness be aware of being fully in control of your flame – something as small as an un-extinguished cigarette is capable of a fully fledged forest fire.

II

FIND YOUR FUEL

After identifying your base – identify and collect your fuel. You’ll want a mix of hard wood as your main fuel along with quicker burning leaves, branches and soft woods to act as igniters. Avoid damp wood for a way better time.

FUEL: Maple, Oak, Ash, Birch.

IGNITERS: Birch bark, Pine twigs, Leaves, twigs and sticks.

“FIRE BURNS BRIGHTER IN THE DARKNESS.”

III

PREP YOUR FUEL

After collecting a large enough source of fuel you’ll want to prep it for your fire.

Wherever possible peel back the bark on logs.

Split any logs you can – with the centre parts generally being the driest and most ignitable.

Prep your additional igniters if applicable (home made fire lighters, additional lighters, ferrocerium rods)

Be ready to take your time.

IV

FOUNDATIONS MAKE THE FLAME

Set the foundations of your fire. There are many accepted shapes but we like the fire lay for a wide range of weather conditions.

Lay one of your larger bits of wood flat – with your twigs and leaves lent against it like a half roof, with your igniters underneath.

Face your structure toward the wind to ensure you aren’t starving your flame, with enough protection that it isn’t blown out.

Lighting the fire can be achieved depending on your loadout, with a key for both being: Protect your flame from the wind.

SURVIVAL: Ferrocerium rod can be used to create sparks to ignite your kindling if you’re saving your matches.

ADVENTURE: Your home made fire lighters will drastically help with the initial ignite. You can also save yourself some calories and use your crisps to help the ignition!

SIGR

SUMMARY

Consider your purpose first and foremost before approaching the task.

Find your location.

Gather appropriate amounts of all types of fuel.

Get more fuel.

Get even more fuel.

Prep your fuel and foundations.

Take your time.

Maintain your fire.

Extinguish correctly.

TIPS

WIND DIRECTION

Lay your larger pieces of wood parallel to wind direction.

WEATHER

If battling damp conditions – use 4 times as much kindling / igniters. You can also build your foundations on a raised base to increase air flow.

EXTINGUISH

Fully extinguish your fire when leaving – 84% of all wildfires are started by humans.

LEAVE NO TRACE

Respect your wild. Leave your fire site as you found it.

RETURN TO SURVIVAL
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SURVIVAL ARCHIVES

HOWL

2019-10-13T20:40:21+00:00
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