ADVENTURE BEGINNERS CAMPING
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CAMPING 1.0

THE CHALLENGE

Adventure: A basic guide for people new to camping. Our goal here is to construct a guide for anyone who has been apprehensive of going on their first camping trip for fear of the unkown’s and variables. Our mission here is to provide a low cost simple solution to make sure everyone takes the chance to reconnect with the wilderness.

STAY WILD. STAY UNTAMED.

MISSION OBJECTIVE

Depending on budget and willingness to hunt adversity – take a camping trip and enjoy a night in the great outdoors. Whilst going alone is fine – we always recommend sharing these moments with friends and family – memories shared together are truly priceless. Disconnect from routine.

STARE UP AT THE STARS, AND LOOK INTO FOREVER.

LOADOUT

I. Sleeping Bag & Sleeping mat

II. Tent / Tarp

III. Sleeping mat

IV. Paracord / String

V. Suitable shoes & Clothing

VI. Food & Water

VII. Camping Gas / Methylated spirit stove

VIII. Lighter or matches

VIII. Camping Knife or Multitool – whichever you have

IX. Books – Comfort addition

IX. Hatchet or mallet – Comfort addition

CONSIDERATIONS

VÆTTFANG

How well do you know the area you are camping in? Do as much research as possible into your surroundings

Potential dangers and threats.

The terrain

The weather patterns

Your way home / To safety

KNOWLEDGE

If you’re new to camping – talk to regular or avid outdoor enthusiasts for advice. If you have a friend who enjoys these pursuits invite them along too!

Lastly – always check camping is permitted in your chosen area!

EXECUTION

I

IDENTIFY LOCATION

First of all it’s imperative that you ensure that you are able to camp in the location chosen. Get recommendations from friends if you know any campers or outdoor adventurers. For your first foray we’d recommend you don’t go too far from home – escape plans are always a good idea if things go bad. Practice setting up your tent prior to embarking on your trip; parks are a great place to start. This will drill the process should you end up setting up in harsher settings. Lastly – know the laws for the area on the use of open flames and fires. We’ve packed stoves for cooking on, so stay in line with local laws on safety.

II

MARK YOUR DEN

Once at your chosen location we’ll now find a suitable spot to pitch up. As always – ensure you aren’t too low or high to avoid cold pooling along with getting some wind resistance.

Next up test your ground. Look for something that isn’t too hard or covered in roots. This will both adversely affect your sleeping and ability to pitch your tent. As your roll out mat isn’t exactly a mattress, find the flattest surface possible.

“SEEK A LIFE THAT REMAINS UNTAMED. SEEK ADVENTURE”

III

ENGAGE & CLEAR

It seems like a small thing – but prep your foundations correctly. As with all things – properly constructed foundations are key to victory. Get rid of all the twigs and branches littered around the floor print that will be your camp.

When clearing – your primary objective is simply to clear for your tent. If you’re staying for a single night you need space for your tent and a good floor. If you’re spending a few days – you’ll want to clear for your entire camp. A spacious entrance in and out so that you can bring out your roll mat to sit on around the fire before returning for sleep works incredibly well. Space to set up for cooking and eating may take up more space than you realise too.

Lastly – designate a place for all of your gear. This is planning ahead for the eventuality of searching for gear in sudden adverse conditions where time may be key. Along with your gear you’ll want to mark a waste hole. Mark a small fist deep pit with a stick as a marker. This is now your bathroom to keep all the human waste in one place.

IV

PITCH YOUR TENT

Your tent doesn’t have to be expensive, at base it simply needs to be capable of a single act: hold off water. Everything else is luxury. This is why using tarp is also a viable alternative should you wish to keep budget low or adventure high. In warmer climates it’s fully possible to camp using a closing hammock, with colder climates likely calling for a tent which has inner and outer layers at a minimum.

Remember – it’s entirely possible to end up inside your tent for extended periods with heavy down pours or strong winds. This is the reason we recommend the packing of books, or friends at the very least to pass the time.

Note: Tent types are listed at the bottom of this article to help with your choice.

SIGR

SUMMARY

FOUNDATIONS

Key to the success of your trip – gather as much intel as possible on your location, complimenting your knowledge from any sources available. The same applies to choosing and constructing your site.

TENT & GEAR

Choose the type depending on your conditions, size of group and amount of hiking involved. For most initial trips you’ll be taking a relatively calm trip in less than harsh conditions so gear choices can be defined by budget.

ADAPT

Be ready to adapt if conditions change – have backup plans and escape routes should things go wrong.

ADVENTURE

Remember why you’re out here. Disconnect to reconnect.

TIPS

DOME TENT

These sturdy tents give you versatility in pitch location as they don’t require guy lines and pegs. Whilst they can be added – as these are free standing tents they are a little heavier due to the extra poles in construction.

TUNNEL TENT

Tunnel tents have guy lines and hooks as part of their build process making them lighter than the dome with a slightly quicker assembly time. Whilst their entrance vestibules are larger – they generally have less headroom.

POPUP / INSTANT TENT

These excel in the speed to set up and weight tests – being incredibly light. That ease comes at a cost with any instant tents being the weakest performance in any adverse condition.

WEATHER

Always check your local weather reports prior to your trips and adapt accordingly.

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2019-10-13T20:04:37+00:00
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